Hong Kong Palace Museum Presents the Palace Museum Culture Lecture Series (Part III)

The Hong Kong Palace Museum (HKPM) will present Part III of the Palace Museum Culture Lecture Series from March to May 2022. At these free public talks, leading experts on Palace Museum culture from Hong Kong, Beijing, and Taipei will share new research that brings to life the distinctive charm of the culture of the Forbidden City.

 

Organised by the HKPM, Parts I and II of the Lecture Series were held last year and received an overwhelming response. The three upcoming talks in Part III will examine respectively the development of European cannon technology in the reign of the Kangxi Emperor, Chinese export ceramics from the Palace Museum collection, and the Qing imperial collection of Islamic jades. Participants will be invited to explore cultural exchanges between China and the world.

 

The details are as follows:

 

European Cannon Technology in the Reign of the Kangxi Emperor (12 March 2022): Dr Chou Weichiang, Curator, HKPM, will explore European cannon technology in the reign of the Kangxi Emperor (1662–1722), as well as technological breakthroughs in the military applications of artillery in this period. European cannons were widely used across Asia by the beginning of the Qing dynasty (1644–1911). Long adept at horseback archery, the Manchus also recognised the importance of firearms. The emperor attached great importance to these weapons—after the Revolt of the Three Feudatories in 1673, the Qing army produced new cannons with the assistance of the Jesuit astronomer and mathematician Ferdinand Verbiest (1623–1688).

 

Ancient Chinese Export Ceramics in the Palace Museum Collection (9 April 2022): Mr Lyu Chenglong, Research Fellow and Director, Department of Antiquities, Palace Museum, will explore the museum’s collection of ancient Chinese export ceramics. The Palace Museum is home to a world-renowned ceramic collection. Particularly well represented are ancient works produced by “The Five Great Kilns” as well as imperial ceramics manufactured in the Ming (1368–1644) and Qing (1644-1911) dynasties by the Imperial Porcelain Factory in Jingdezhen. Export ceramics in the museum’s collection came from a variety of sources, including government allocations, donations from private or corporate collectors, as well as purchases made after 1949, with only a small number of works from the Qing court collection. A less known category, Chinese export ceramics nevertheless represent a significant area of growth in the overall collection of the Palace Museum. Since 1949, allocations made by the National Cultural Heritage Administration and China Federation of Literary and Art Circles, as well as museum purchases, have contributed to the growth of the Chinese export ceramic collection at the Museum, which reflects a growing interest in this area among scholars and collectors.

 

Precious Jades from the Western Regions: Analysing and Appreciating the Diversity of Islamic Jades in the Qing Imperial Collection (14 May 2022): Ms Teng Shu-p'ing, former Chief Curator, Department of Antiquities, Palace Museum, Taipei, will explore the reasons why a large number of jades from the Islamic world travelled to China and entered the Qing imperial collection in the second half of the eighteenth century. Ms Teng explains the functions of these jades, and uses their artistic traits as a basis to identify four regional styles, including those of jades from the Mughal Empire in North India and the Ottoman Empire in Turkey. In addition, she will use poems composed by the Qianlong Emperor (r. 1736–1795) and engraved on these jades to analyse the emperor’s aesthetics and the myths he conjured up about some of these jades.

 

Programme details:

 

Zoom 1: European Cannon Technology in the Reign of the Kangxi Emperor

Date: 12 March 2022 (Saturday)
Time: 10:00–11:00am (Hong Kong time)
Format: Online
Platform: Zoom
Speaker: Dr Chou Weichiang, Curator, Hong Kong Palace Museum
Language: Mandarin with simultaneous interpretation in Cantonese; subtitles not available
Fee: Free

 

Zoom 2: Ancient Chinese Export Ceramics in the Palace Museum Collection

Date: 9 April 2022 (Saturday)
Time: 10:00–11:00am (Hong Kong time)
Format: Online
Platform: Zoom
Speaker: Mr Lyu Chenglong, Research Fellow and Director, Department of Antiquities, Palace Museum
Language: Mandarin with simultaneous interpretation in Cantonese; subtitles not available
Fee: Free

 

Zoom 3: Precious Jades from the Western Regions: Analysing and Appreciating the Diversity of Islamic Jades in the Qing Imperial Collection

Date: 14 May 2022 (Saturday)
Time: 10:00–11:00am (Hong Kong time)
Format: Online
Platform: Zoom
Speaker: Ms Teng Shu-p'ing, former Chief Curator, Department of Antiquities, Palace Museum, Taipei
Language: Mandarin with simultaneous interpretation in Cantonese; subtitles not available
Fee: Free

 

 

Speaker biographies:

 

Dr Chou Weichiang, Curator, Hong Kong Palace Museum
Dr Chou Weichiang received his PhD from Tsing Hua University in Hsinchu, Taiwan, in 2008. Prior to his appointment at the Hong Kong Palace Museum, he served as Associate Curator at the Palace Museum, Taipei, where he curated numerous exhibitions, including “Treasures from Heaven: A Special Exhibition of Artifacts from the Holy See” and “Portrayals from a Brush Divine: A Special Exhibition on the Tricentennial of Giuseppe Castiglione's Arrival in China”. His research focuses on the history of technology, Chinese diplomatic history, military history, as well as historical GIS applications and museum studies. Dr Chou has authored two monographs on military history, The Frankish Breech Loader in China and Battlewagons in Ming China. In addition, he has compiled a wide variety of publications on Qing historical and archival documents.

 

Mr Lyu Chenglong, Research Fellow and Director, Department of Antiquities, Palace Museum
Mr Lyu Chenglong holds a number of significant positions at the Palace Museum, including Research Fellow, Member of the Academic Committee, Director of the Department of Antiquities, and Director of the Ceramics Research Institute. He received his education in the Engineering Department of the Jingdezhen Ceramic Institute, and later in the MA programme on Qing history jointly offered by the Renmin University and the Palace Museum. A leading expert in the identification, exhibition, and care of ancient ceramics, Lyu mainly researches ceramic technologies and the evolution of ceramic forms and decoration. He has published and edited over twenty books and authored more than one hundred scholarly papers and other articles. Lyu has also conducted field work at a few dozen kiln sites in China. He has served as speaker and visiting scholar in the United States, Germany, France, Turkey, Hong Kong, Macao, and Taiwan.

 

Ms Teng Shu-p'ing, former Chief Curator, Department of Antiquities, Palace Museum, Taipei
Ms Teng Shu-p’ing is the former Chief Curator of the Department of Antiquities, Palace Museum, Taipei. She attained her master’s degree in history from Taiwan University while working as an assistant to the celebrated archaeologist, Dr Li Ji, at the Institute of History and Philology, Academia Sinica. She began her career at the Palace Museum, Taipei in 1974 and was appointed the Chief Curator of the Department of Antiquities in 2007. She retired from Palace Museum, Taipei in 2013 and joined Peking University as a visiting scholar in 2017. Teng has published prolifically in the areas of ancient Chinese jades and prehistoric art, including over ten books, two hundred research papers and articles. Her key works include Neolithic Jades in the Collection of the Palace Museum, Taipei, 1999 Collectors’ Exhibition of Archaic Chinese Jades, Exquisite Beauty: Islamic Jades, New Interpretations of Ancient Jades: Essays on Prehistoric Chinese Jades, and The Wisdom and Ignorance of Emperor Qianlong: Perceptions on Ancient Jade as Viewed Through His Poems. She is now in the process of publishing the second volume of the Select Jades in the Palace Museum, Taipei series, the first volume of which was published in 2019.

 

Remarks

 

About the Hong Kong Palace Museum
The Hong Kong Palace Museum aspires to become one of the world's leading cultural institutions committed to the study and appreciation of Chinese art and culture, while advancing dialogue among world civilisations through international partnerships. Scheduled to open in July 2022, the Museum is a collaborative project between the West Kowloon Cultural District Authority and the Palace Museum. The capital cost of the Museum is fully funded by a donation of HK$3.5 billion from The Hong Kong Jockey Club Charities Trust.

 

Embracing new curatorial approaches, the Museum will offer a Hong Kong perspective and a global vision, presenting the finest objects from the Palace Museum and other important cultural institutions around the world. Through innovative research and travelling exhibitions, as well as educational, cultural, and professional exchange programmes, the Museum will build international partnerships and help position Hong Kong as a hub for art and cultural exchanges between China and the rest of the world. As a world-class institution, the Museum is, at heart, a cultural resource that belongs to the community of Hong Kong. And as a dynamic platform, it will inspire community engagement, foster dialogue and partnerships, and promote creativity and interdisciplinary collaboration. 
https://www.westkowloon.hk/en/hkpm

 

About the West Kowloon Cultural District
The West Kowloon Cultural District is one of the largest and most ambitious cultural projects in the world. Its vision is to create a vibrant new cultural quarter for Hong Kong on forty hectares of reclaimed land located alongside Victoria Harbour. With a varied mix of theatres, performance spaces, and museums, the West Kowloon Cultural District will produce and host world-class exhibitions, performances and cultural events, providing twenty-three hectares of public open space, including a two-kilometre waterfront promenade.